Will a work accident claim affect my future employment prospects?

If you’ve suffered an illness or injury, and the circumstances which brought this about were caused by someone else’s negligence, then it’s only right and fair that you should be in a position to claim compensation. Not only will this reimburse you for any expenses incurred via your predicament, but it will also help to restore your sense of fairness and of justice being done. After all, you’ve already suffered because of the mistakes of another, so why should you go on suffering into the future?

Often, the case for making a claim for compensation can seem fairly straightforward; if you’ve been involved in a car accident which wasn’t your fault, for example, or slipped and hurt yourself on a wet floor which should have been cleared up. When it comes to making a claim for an accident at work, however, things can seem a little bit more complicated.

Many people hesitate to launch a claim against their employers due to worries over what the ramifications may be. They fear, for example, that they may be in danger of losing their job or being harassed in the workplace. In truth, however, there are very strict laws against either of these and any employer found guilty of mistreating an employee making a claim would be punished in the strongest possible terms. Another factor which makes many people hesitate is a misplaced sense of loyalty which leads them to worry they will be leaving their employer or workmates out of pocket. Actually, claims of this kind are covered by employers’ liability insurance, meaning that even the most negligent employer won’t have to pay a penny of their own money.

Finally, some people are concerned that a claim for compensation may have an adverse effect on their chances of future employment. They fear that they will somehow be seen as a ‘troublemaker’ and not the kind of person an employer would like to take on. In truth, however, it’s against the law for a potential employer to ask if you’ve ever made a claim for compensation, as it’s seen as being as discriminatory as asking questions about race, sexuality or religious beliefs. What all of this amounts to is the simple fact that the only thing you should consider when weighing up a claim for compensation is the legitimacy of your case.

 

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