I’m not completely certain who was responsible for my injury – can I still make a claim?

When you’re making a claim for compensation then there are two basic elements which simply have to be in place. The first of these is that you’ve suffered some kind of injury. The term ‘injury’ can cover physical or psychological damage. Physical damage is usually easier to spot, taking the form of cuts, bruises, broken limbs etc., whilst psychological damage may take longer to manifest itself and will probably require diagnosis from an expert. Psychological reaction to an accident or injury may include depression, anxiety, panic attacks and disturbing flashbacks to the event.

Once it’s been established that an injury has been sustained it has to be demonstrated that this injury came about as the result of someone else’s negligence. The ‘someone else’ in question might be an individual, such the driver of a car, a body with responsibility for a public space such as a council, or an organisation like the NHS or a private clinic. In every case it has to be demonstrated that this other party behaved in a manner which was negligent, thus causing the accident.

In most circumstances, the issue of who you feel was to blame for your injury will be fairly cut and dried, but occasionally it may be a little more complicated. If you trip over something in the street and injure yourself, for example, is this the responsibility of the local council, the shop which the debris you tripped over was left outside or the workmen who left it there? Answering questions like this is the job of an expert injury solicitor.

If you’ve been injured in an accident but are not 100% certain exactly who was to blame then contact a lawyer at the earliest possible opportunity. They’ll take down the details of your case and advise as to exactly who you should make a claim against, what you will be claiming for and how much compensation you might be likely to receive. If you’ve been injured because someone else was negligent then don’t let your uncertainty stop you pursuing the compensation which is rightfully yours.

 

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