How is compensation calculated in the event of a limb being lost?

Fortunately, the vast majority of compensation claims revolve around injuries which, over time, can be fully recovered from. Sometimes, however, things are more serious and in the worst cases the victim of an accident may find that they end up losing a limb.

The way in which the limb is lost can vary. It may be instant, at the time of the injury itself, or it may be as the result of a badly damaged limb such as an arm or leg having to be amputated. In some cases, indeed, the limb in question may still be present but be rendered ineffective through paralysis. No matter what the individual circumstances are, an accident of this kind is going to have a massive effect on the victims’ life. Everyday tasks such as getting around, dressing, eating and washing will become much more difficult and may even require the assistance of a full time carer.

If your life has been turned upside down in this manner then it’s only right that you should be able to claim compensation from the party who is to blame. In the event of a genuine accident there’s little that can be done, but if someone’s negligence was to blame then you may well be in a position to put in a compensation claim.

When making a claim of this kind it’s imperative to demonstrate that the accident in question was the fault of someone else, and that it led to long term injury on your part. Any compensation awarded will, in the first instance, be intended to reimburse the victim for any expenses incurred. You may, for example, have to pay to have your home modified to accommodate your physical condition, or to purchase the best possible prosthetic limb. On top of this you will receive an amount calculated on the basis of the type and severity of your injury. Although amounts may vary depending on factors such as the victims’ age and the exact circumstances of the accident, an injury solicitor should, when putting your case together, be able to give you an estimate of how much you are likely to receive.

 

Back to Common Questions